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Who is a respite care provider?

A respite care provider is an individual or an organization that provides in-home or out-of-home care to an individual with special needs, giving temporary relief to their primary caregivers.

types of respite care providers

  • For-Profit - The care provider offers services with the intent to make a profit. For-profit providers may accept Medicaid, Medicare, or private insurance. These providers may include home health agencies, nursing facilities, and assisted living facilities.

  • Non-Profit/Faith-Based - The care provider is affiliated with particular religion. Often, services are provided free-of-charge or at a significantly reduced rate. Care providers are often trained volunteers. These providers may include congregational caregiving cooperatives.

  • Non-Profit/Community-Based - The care provider is a non-profit organization providing community services. Services are often provided free-of-charge or at a significantly reduced rate. These providers may include community centers or after-school programs.

  • Non-Profit/Volunteer-Based - The care provider is not affiliated with a faith-based or community-sponsored organization. Services are often provided free-of-charge or for a nominal fee. These providers may include organizations developed by caregiver groups or local chapters of national organizations.

  • Government - The care provider is provided through a governmental agency, either on a regional, state, or national basis. Services are often provided free-of-charge or at a significantly reduced rate. Eligibility requirements may apply.

Find a Respite Care Provider Near You

Where Is Respite Care Provided?

Respite care can be provided in a variety of different settings, depending on your needs:

In-Home Respite

  • In-Home Respite Care - A care provider travels to your home to stay with your loved one. The provider may sit with your loved one and talk or do activities. You may stay in the home and attend to other matters or you may leave for a period of time. In-home respite care may be offered by a variety of organizations including home health agencies, religious organizations, community groups, or governmental agencies.

  • Personal Care - The care provider may help your loved one with grooming activities like brushing teeth, dressing, bathing, shaving, or using the restroom. They may also assist with preparing meals or remind your loved one to take necessary medications.

  • Homemaker Services - The care provider may do light housework and chores around the house so that you don't have so much to do later on. These tasks may include grocery shopping, laundry, meal preparation, or doing the dishes.

  • Crisis/Emergency Care - The care provider can come quickly when you have a family emergency or other situation that prevents you from being able to care for your loved one. Crisis care is often available overnight, but is not usually offered for more than a few days.

  • Medical Care - Also known as skilled nursing, the care provider is a registered nurse qualified to assist your loved one with medical devices such as IVs, feeding tubes, catheters, or post-operative care.

Out-of-Home Respite

  • Out-of-Home Respite Care - Care is provided in an outside facility where you drop off your loved one and pick them up after the respite period has ended. This type of respite care may be offered through organizations like camps for those with functional needs, nursing homes, and senior activity centers. Some out-of-home care providers also offer overnight and longer-term respite care.

  • Day Center Non-Medical/Social - The care provider cannot accommodate special medical needs (there are no nurses or other medical professionals on staff), but they can still provide valuable socialization opportunities for your loved one. Meals or snacks are often provided and planned activities are provided for your loved one throughout the day. The respite period may be more flexible and allow you to drop off or pick up your loved one within a range of times (e.g. between 10:00 and 4:00), rather than pre-appointed times. Senior activity centers and community centers fall into this category.

  • Day Center Medical - The care provider employs specially-trained staff to cater to your loved one's medical needs throughout the day. A broad variety of medical conditions can usually be accommodated. Meals or snacks are often provided and activities or entertainment may be organized. Specialized day care facilities or camps for children and adults with special needs fall into this category.

  • Assisted Living Facility - The care provider offers comprehensive services for respite, including overnight and long-term stays. Trained staff will closely supervise your loved one and medical supervision and care may be provided, but is not always available. This type of care is more commonly tailored to caring for older persons, however facilities catering to children and younger adults do exist. Many assisted living facilities have specially-trained staff and specialized, secure areas for persons with memory impairments. Some facilities may require your loved one to stay for a minimum number of days to receive services.

  • Nursing Facility - The care provider offers comprehensive services for respite, including overnight and long-term stays. Staff includes medical professionals and often provides more intensive supervision of your loved one. Many facilities have specially-trained staff and specialized, secure areas for persons with memory impairments. Some facilities may require your loved one to stay for a minimum number of days to receive services.

Contact Us:


Colorado Respite Coalition
5755 W Alameda Ave
Lakewood, CO 80226

303-233-1666 Phone
303-233-1028 Fax

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